Pages

Ads 468x60px

Featured Posts

Michael C. Hall Talks David Bowie's Death, His Role on Stage, and Why Death Stalks Him

As the lead in David Bowie’s musical Lazarus, Michael C. Hall felt the singer’s death like...

Dexter Alumna Charlotte Rampling Nabs Her First Oscar Nod

Former Dexter special guest star Charlotte Rampling gets her first Oscar nod. Rampling 69, who played the role of Evelyn Vogel in 10 episodes of Dexter's final...

Dexter Spin-off Update at TCA 2016: "Maybe There Will Be a Time, But Only If All the Stars Align"

It was a Showtime day on Tuesday at the Television Critics Association winter press tour. Between others, Showtime execs. where asked again regarding a possible return...

Michael C. Hall on The Late Show With Stephen Colbert

Watch below a short part from Michael C. Hall's interview on last night's The Late Show with Stephen Colbert:

VIDEO: Michael C. Hall Performs a Song From David Bowie’s “Lazarus” on The Late Show

The following video will give you the chills! Michael C. Hall was Stephen Colbert's guest on...

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Michael C. Hall Ties the Knot With Morgan Macgregor!

Michael C. Hall is a married man... again! Five years after his divorce with Jennifer Carpenter he ties the knot with longtime girlfriend Morgan Macgregor in a surprise New York wedding on February 29th.

No other details about their surprise ceremony have been revealed. Michael and Macgregor, a Los Angeles-based book reviewer and novelist, have been together for nearly four years.

This is Hall's third marriage. He was previously married to actresses Amy Spanger and his Dexter co-star Jennifer Carpenter, whom he wed in 2008 and divorced in 2011.

Monday, February 1, 2016

Happy Birthday, Michael C. Hall!


Today, our favorite Michael C. Hall turns 45! Born Michael Carlyle Hall on February 1, 1971 he is a North Carolina native and graduate of NYU's Master of Fine Arts program in acting. His most recent performance was on Broadway as the emcee in "Cabaret. On television, he starred for five seasons on Six Feet Under, playing the role of David Fisher, and for eight whole seasons, everyone's favorite serial killer Dexter. His most recent leading role is for David Bowie's 'Lazarus'. Happy b-day Michael!

Thursday, January 21, 2016

Michael C. Hall on 'Christine' - Promotional Photos


The Hollywood Reporter has an exclusive first look at Michael C. Hall's latest role, this time for the film 'Christine'.

Hall, playing a fellow local anchor George seems like the typical all-American character, but he sits at the news desk unsettled. Check out more pics and info about the film, here.

Monday, January 18, 2016

Michael C. Hall Talks David Bowie's Death, His Role on Stage, and Why Death Stalks Him



via theguardian: As the lead in David Bowie’s musical Lazarus, Michael C. Hall felt the singer’s death like an ‘internal fist clench’. The former Dexter star talks about inhabiting the role Bowie first played in The Man Who Fell to Earth – and his own struggle with cancer.

When David Bowie and Michael C Hall met for the first time, the rock star looked at the actor, held him in his gaze for a moment and then asked: “What is it with you?”

Hall didn’t ask him to elaborate; he knew Bowie meant “death”. You can’t shake how strange a constant it has been in the 44-year-old’s life and work. Consider his great TV roles. First, there was HBO’s wonderful Six Feet Under, in which Hall made his name as the tightly wound David Fisher, a mortician in the family’s funeral parlour. Then, his stardom exploded with the Showtime series Dexter, in which he played a droll forensics expert who moonlights as a serial killer of serial killers. And now, Hall is the star of a show bound up, inside and out, with death, immortality and the afterlife. In Lazarus – the David Bowie musical that sold out long before it opened and well before the Starman himself died – Hall plays Thomas Newton, a man who can’t die.

So when he woke up last Monday and learned, via “25 or 30 texts”, that Bowie had passed away, Hall felt a familiar “internal fist clench”.

Handsome and anonymous in a West Village cafe, he balls his right hand and then spreads his fingers wide as he tries to explain: “Some sort of old survival mechanism kicks in. I think it’s about holding on, it’s about mirroring what I see to not be victimised by trauma.” And then these words come out in a quiet rush: “To not be a pitiful, fatherless son.”

When Hall was 11, that fulcrum age of not really child but not quite teenager, he lost his dad to cancer. It is young to experience death, but Hall’s life was coloured by it from the start: his older sister died from congenital heart disease before he was born.

It is easy, in other words, to get pretty heavy – pretty fast – with him.

“It’s all right,” he laughs, “it’s inevitable ...” and he makes a laissez-faire wave. Because, luckily for him, Hall also has a great capacity for silliness. You can see levity in everything he does – in the eyes of that affable murderer Dexter, or in the movement of the leaping but gravity-bound Newton on stage at the New York Theater Workshop.

Before Lazarus, Hall was splattered with glitter on Broadway in the title role of the gender-bending Hedwig and the Angry Inch. “Which served,” he jokes, “as a very elaborate glam audition.” He already had the job before he met Bowie, but when it came time to sing, “I felt the butterflies start turning to bats. And Bowie said,” – Hall affects a voice of self-mocking kingliness – “‘Now sing my songs for me.’”

Bowie took pains to put people at ease. He was so generous, and palpably kind
In other words: “He was sort of naming the absurdity of the moment, which I really appreciated. I think he took pains to put people at ease. He was so generous, and palpably kind.”

Head over to The Guardian to read the full interview.